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Summer Reading List 

Summer Reading Requirements

 

 

Hewitt Trussville High School Summer Reading Requirements (for the 2017-18 School Year)

 

1. ALL HTHS STUDENTS (grades 9-12) will read ONE of the following books over the summer of 2017. Within the first week of school, students will be asked to write an essay in class on one of the books below. To prepare for this, read the book and take notes (or annotate).

 

● The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner: Dill has had to wrestle with vipers his whole life—at home, as the only son of a Pentecostal minister who urges him to handle poisonous rattlesnakes, and at school, where he faces down bullies who target him for his father’s extreme faith and very public fall from grace. The only antidote to all this venom is his friendship with fellow outcasts Travis and Lydia. But as they are starting their senior year, Dill feels the coils of his future tightening around him. Dill’s only escapes are his music and his secret feelings for Lydia—neither of which he is brave enough to share. Graduation feels more like an ending to Dill than a beginning. But even before then, he must cope with another ending—one that will rock his life to the core (synopsis from amazon.com).

● When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi: At the age of thirty-six, on the verge of completing a decade’s worth of training as a neurosurgeon, Paul Kalanithi was diagnosed with stage IV lung cancer. One day he was a doctor treating the dying, and the next he was a patient struggling to live. And just like that, the future he and his wife had imagined evaporated. When Breath Becomes Air chronicles Kalanithi’s transformation from a naïve medical student “possessed,” as he wrote, “by the question of what, given that all organisms die, makes a virtuous and meaningful life” into a neurosurgeon at Stanford working in the brain, the most critical place for human identity, and finally into a patient and new father confronting his own mortality. What makes life worth living in the face of death? What do you do when the future, no longer a ladder toward your goals in life, flattens out into a perpetual present? What does it mean to have a child, to nurture a new life as another fades away? These are some of the questions Kalanithi wrestles with in this profoundly moving, exquisitely observed memoir (synopsis from amazon.com).

● Ready Player One by Ernest Cline: In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he's jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade's devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world's digital confines—puzzles that are based on their creator's obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. But when Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade's going to survive, he'll have to win—and confront the real world he's always been so desperate to escape (synopsis from amazon.com).

● The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon: Over the course of a single day in New York City, two teenagers who have nothing in common randomly meet and fall in love. Now I know that sounds absurdly cliché, but somehow in Nicola Yoon’s hands, it doesn’t read that way. Natasha is a practical young woman trying to keep her family from being deported in a matter of hours. Daniel is a poet at heart, but on this day he is dutifully making good on his familial commitment to a college interview. The two are inexplicably drawn to each other and somehow their paths keep converging. The novel is told in alternating from points of view, and one of the special touches of Yoon’s book are the chapters narrated by people who are unintentionally part of Natasha and Daniel’s story, mirroring our almost spooky interconnectedness. The Sun is Also a Star is a thought-provoking story of possibility, fate, and the illogical beauty of love (from Seira Wilson, The Amazon Book Review).

● The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh: Every dawn brings horror to a different family in a land ruled by a killer. Khalid, the eighteen-year-old Caliph of Khorasan, takes a new bride each night only to have her executed at sunrise. So it is a suspicious surprise when sixteen-year-old Shahrzad volunteers to marry Khalid. But she does so with a clever plan to stay alive and exact revenge on the Caliph for the murder of her best friend and countless other girls. Shazi’s wit and will, indeed, get her through to the dawn that no others have seen, but with a catch . . . she’s falling in love with the very boy who killed her dearest friend (amazon.com).

 

2. HONORS CLASSES ONLY--Pre-AP English 9 and 10, Dual Enrollment, and AP students: You will be asked to read the above as well as an ADDITIONAL text. Your additional assignment is below:

 

● Pre-AP English 9: The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (test during first week of school)

● Pre-AP English 10: EITHER The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain OR Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (test during first week of school)

● AP Language and Composition (Grade 11): Make sure to read this entire section! *Do not wait until the last minute to order your textbook!!!

1. PART I: The Language of Composition, 2nd Edition by Renee Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, and Robin Aufses will be our textbook this year. You are required to purchase this book (new or used); please get the correct edition. For the summer, you are required to do the assignments listed below. If you cannot purchase this book for financial reasons, please contact Stephen.mcclurg@trussvillecityschools.com by June 3rd at the latest. The best place to get this book is from online booksellers like Amazon.

IF YOU COPY ANSWERS FROM THE INTERNET OR FROM ANOTHER STUDENT, YOU WILL RECEIVE A ZERO. IF YOU ALLOW SOMEONE TO COPY YOUR ANSWERS, YOU WILL RECEIVE A ZERO. IF YOU WORK WITH ANOTHER STUDENT AND WRITE DOWN THE EXACT SAME ANSWERS, YOU WILL BOTH RECEIVE ZEROES. YOU MAY WORK COLLABORATIVELY, BUT YOUR WORK MUST BE YOUR OWN. YOU SIGNED UP FOR A COLLEGE CLASS FOR A REASON!

All of the assignments are to be handwritten, clearly labeled, and turned in on the first day of school. All assignments should fully answer the question to receive ANY credit.

Study the vocabulary words at the end of chapters 1-2, pages 36-38 and 78-80. You will take a vocabulary test on the first day of school. Be prepared to know both the definition and be able to recognize examples of the terms.

You will take a reading quiz on the first day of school on the essays assigned below. Annotations are not required but they will help you prepare for the quiz. Please review pages 50-51 for guidance on annotating. Read chapters 1-2 before reading the essays as they are meant to help you answer the questions.

1. Read pages 1-29. Read all pieces on these pages even if included in unassigned activities. Complete the activities on the following pages: 6 and 29.

2. Read pages 39-68. Read all pieces on these pages even if included in unassigned activities. Complete the activities on the following pages: 41, 56, and 68.

3. Read the essay on page 323. Answer questions 2-5, 7-9, 12, 14 under Exploring the Text on page 336.

4. Read the essay on page 449. Answer questions 1-2, 4-7, 12 under Exploring the Text on page 459.

5. Read the essay on page 541. Answer questions 1-2, 4-6, 8-9 under Exploring the Text on page 545.

6. Read the essay on page 643. Answer questions 1-6, 9 under Exploring the Text on page 657-658.

7. Read the essay on page 788. Answer questions 1, 4, 7 under Questions for Discussion and 1, 3-5, 8-9 Questions on Rhetoric and Style on page 797.

8. Read the essay on page 888. Answer questions 1-4, 7-8 under Questions on Rhetoric and Style on page 895-896.

9. Read the essay on page 1100. Answer questions 1-4 on page 1106.

2. PART II: Read one book from the schoolwide reading list and be prepared for a written assignment the first week of school.

SUMMARY of FIRST WEEK OF SCHOOL :

● Vocabulary quiz on chapters 1-2 of Language of Composition

● Reading quiz on essays (items 3-9 listed above in Language of Composition)

● Turn in activities and answers to questions above from Language of Composition

● Writing assignment on choice book from schoolwide reading list

 

● Dual Enrollment English (Grade 12) and AP Literature and Composition (Grade 12): How to Read Literature Like a Professor (revised edition) by Thomas C. Foster (test during first week of school)

 

If you have questions, please go to the HTHS website and find an English teacher to email or contact the HTHS front office.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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